The Roundtable

Welcome to the Roundtable, JLPP’s online blog featuring student commentary on current cases and legal developments!

If you are interested in becoming a Staff Writer or Contributing Writer for the Roundtable, e-mail Notes Editors Kyle Reynolds (mreynolds@jd18.law.harvard.edu) or Chadwick Harper (charper@jd19.law.harvard.edu).

FedSoc Lunch Event: Adult Sentencing for Adult Crimes

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On February 11, 2014, The Harvard Federalist Society hosting an event titled “Adult Sentencing for Adult Crimes” featuring Charles D. Stimson. Mr. Stimson is a Senior Legal Fellow at the Heritage Foundation where his work focuses on a number of substantive legal areas including Juvenile Sentencing. In 2009, Mr. Stimson and his co-author Andrew Grossman published a short book, Adult Time for Adult Crime, with the Heritage Foundation arguing that sentencing juveniles to life without parole (“JLWOP”) for homicides and other violent crimes was...

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Student Note Preview: Political Question Doctrine in Zivotofsky v. Clinton

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Carol Szurkowski provides a preview of her student note in the current issue (Volume 37, Issue 1) of the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy:   In 2012, the Supreme Court decided Zivotofsky ex rel. Zivotofsky v. Clinton, 132 S. Ct. 1421, in which it held that the political question doctrine could not be invoked to dismiss a suit involving the question whether an American citizen born in Jerusalem can enforce his statutory right to have “Israel” listed as his birthplace on his passport.  Chief Justice Roberts’ opinion for the Court...

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David Rivkin & Lee Casey on the Recess Appointments Case

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In this morning’s Wall Street Journal, David B. Rivkin, Jr., and Lee A. Casey preview Noel Canning v. NLRB, a case to be heard in the Supreme Court this month concerning three appointments made by President Obama two years ago while the Senate was in pro forma sessions: Noel Canning v. NLRB involves several recess appointments President Obama made to the National Labor Relations Board on Jan. 4, 2012. The federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., correctly held that these appointments were unconstitutional both because they filled...

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Seven Score and 10 Years Ago…

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Here at the Roundtable, we attempt to hew closely to our mission of presenting conservative and libertarian musings on the intersection of law and policy, but there are certain days of reflection that call for a slight aberration. There have been times in our history when an event is so significant that observers seek to commemorate the occasion almost instantaneously. This was the case on November 19, 1863. Not five months after the terrible and awesome Battle of Gettysburg, we gathered at a graveyard steps from the battlefield in Gettysburg...

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Penn Law Prof. Waxes Nostalgic about Bygone Moral Regulation

Posted by on 8:27 am in Event Memoranda, FedSoc | Comments Off on Penn Law Prof. Waxes Nostalgic about Bygone Moral Regulation

Christopher Dillon Liedl, Guest Writer University of Pennsylvania Law School Professor, Amy Wax, delivered a talk entitled “Education, Marriage, and Class in America” to the Harvard Federalist Society this past Tuesday, October 29. A graduate of both Columbia Law School and Harvard Medical School, Professor Wax has been a professor at Penn since 2001 teaching courses on social welfare law and civil procedure. Opening her talk with a discussion of contemporary family trends, Professor Wax observed how the conception of marriage has shifted...

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The Harvard Federalist Society Presents: “Private Management of Public Lands”

Posted by on 8:46 pm in Event Memoranda, FedSoc | Comments Off on The Harvard Federalist Society Presents: “Private Management of Public Lands”

On Tuesday, November 5, 2013, The Harvard Federalist Society hosted John A. Baden, Ph.D., to speak on the topic “Private Management of Public Lands.” Baden is the founder and chairman of the Foundation for Research on Economics and the Environment (FREE) based in Bozeman, Montana. FREE promotes free market environmentalism as a way to protect national parks, forests, and wild lands. Matthew Stephenson, Harvard Law School professor, offered a response. Stephenson’s areas of interest include Administrative and Constitutional Law, as well as...

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My White Whale

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My White Whale

Studying the law is demanding.  meaningful.  humbling.  rewarding.  wearying.  complex.  Learning from some of the most famous, respected, and brilliant professors and practitioners on the planet can be surreal.  For many of these folks, any and all lulls in activity can be filled with the law.  Seriously.  One professors told my class that he cracked the Sixth Amendment while sitting in traffic.  Certain professors have a gift for making otherwise opaque concepts or complex theories into simple and unavoidable conclusions.  Yet when these...

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The Religion of Procedure

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The Religion of Procedure

Though it may seem at odds with my intense patriotism, I spent the Columbus Day weekend in Paris, but—rest assured—my mind never strays too far from our topic on the Roundtable. On the flight back, I watched a few episodes of the riveting, thrilling, and smart HBO mini-series “Rome.” The show chronicles the transition from Ancient Rome’s republic to Julius Caesar’s dictatorship to his adoptive son’s reign as Augustus Caesar. I have seen the series many times before, but this weekend, one particular scene caught my attention in a new way. To...

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The First Monday in October

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The First Monday in October

This October has certainly been unique thus far.  Between the Obamacare exchanges opening, the capture of Anas al-Libi in Libya, and the proposed secession of North Colorado, and of course the one-week-and-counting government shutdown, the United States citizens and their government are defying traditions this month. Except at 1 First St. NE, Washington D.C. Roundtable readers are likely aware that yesterday, like every “First Monday in October” since 1917, the nine Supreme Court Justices held their first oral arguments of the October 2013...

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United States v. North Carolina

Posted by on 7:48 pm in Musings | Comments Off on United States v. North Carolina

By Jonathan H. Levy With Americans beginning to feel the effects of the latest government shutdown, it might seem that money drives our government.  But cash is closer to the car’s gasoline than its driver: gasoline powers the engine, but especially today, it is clear that the car, gasoline, and engine are useless without Messrs. Reid and Boehner in the driver’s seat, negotiating with each other.  This Shutdown Tuesday, I’m thinking about those drivers and the lawsuit Attorney General Eric Holder filed Monday in Greensboro, North Carolina,...

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